Valley Vision Clinic

22 W Main St

Walla Walla, WA 99362

509-529-2020 (phone/text)

509-529-2115 (fax)

info@valleyvisionclinic.com

Open Monday thru Friday at 8am

 

 

 


BOB2017

Voted Walla Walla's

Best Vision Center 

 

Contact Lenses

Contact Lenses

We provide comprehensive cornea and contact lens care.  After an eye examination we evaluate your eyes and determine which type of contact lens will best suit your individual needs. We prescribe all major brands of soft and ridged contact lenses.  Additionally, we prescribe custom designed contact lenses for special needs as well as special eye problems. 

 

A good contact lens fit starts with a comprehensive eye examination to ensure the most up-to-date prescription and rule out any pre-existing conditions that could interfere with contact lens wear. Our doctors will determine the best fitting lens based on your lifestyle needs, the shape and health of your eye.

 
We follow up the initial fitting and then make any necessary changes in fit or materials to get you the best possible fit. We teach all our patients proper contact lens care and also possible consequences if proper care is not taken. Then we continue with long-term follow-up to monitor the condition of the lenses and to ensure that proper hygiene is being maintained.

Valley Vision offers many choices for contact lens use. Today’s busy and active lifestyle demand lens options that can keep up. Contact lenses offer hassle-free vision correction and gives you the option of wearing non-prescription sunglasses and goggles. Patients with high prescription, astigmatism or bifocals can benefit from wearing contact lenses.


Soft Lenses are the most popular type of lenses. These lenses are comfortable to wear and must be replaced monthly, bi-weekly or daily depending on the type you choose. Soft lenses are often recommended for sports because they fit closer to the eye and are more difficult to dislodge. They can provide correction for most prescriptions including astigmatism. Today, with the introduction of newer materials like silicone hydrogels, which allow more oxygen to the eye, patients find it easier than ever to wear soft lenses comfortably.


Regardless of the type of contact lenses you wear, an annual eye exam is necessary to ensure the continued good health of your eyes.


Disposables Contact Lens

Disposable contact lenses are extremely popular these days. As an alternative to hard lenses of the past and rigid gas permeable lenses of today, they are generally considered to be far superior in comfort and wear ability. They come in many different varieties, and it is important to know which is best for you. Our eye doctors will give you a contact lens evaluation examination find the right fit for you. Below, our trusted eye care professionals can give you a brief explanation of some of the major types of disposable contact lenses on the market today.


Gas Permeable (GP) Contact Lenses

Gas Permeable (GP) or Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) contact lenses are an alternative to soft contact lenses that are made from a hard, oxygen permeable material. GP lenses are currently less popular than soft lenses but offer a number of advantages and are continuing to improve as research and technology advance.


GP contacts are made of a firm plastic material which allows the passage of oxygen through the lens to your cornea and the front surface of your eye – essentially allowing your eye to “breathe”. This increases comfort, health and safety during contact lens wear.


Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses

If you are over 40 and have difficulty seeing close up, you probably have a common age-related condition called presbyopia which is when the eye’s natural lens loses the ability to focus on close objects. Presbyopia is a natural process as the eye ages and affects the majority of people from age 40 and upward. Individuals with presbyopia are often familiar with the need to hold reading materials such as newspapers an arm’s length away from their eyes in order to see clearly, yet reading glasses with bifocal or multifocal (progressive) lenses can help.


Fortunately for those who don’t like the look, feel or inconvenience of reading glasses, there is another option. Bifocal and multifocal lenses are also available in contact lenses in both soft and Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) varieties.


Multifocal contact lenses give you added freedom over glasses and they allow you to be able to view any direction – up, down and to the sides – with similar vision. People wearing progressive lenses in glasses on the other hand have to look over their glasses if they want to view upwards or into the distance.


Toric Contact Lenses for Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a condition that is caused by an irregular shape of the cornea – the clear part of the eye that covers the iris and the pupil. The cornea is usually smooth, round, and spherical but in an astigmatic eye, the cornea turns into a shape that is not spherical and develops a second curve. One of the primary duties of the cornea is to focus light onto the retina which enables you to see clearly. When the cornea is out of shape and develops two curves, this created two focal points therefore causing blurred vision.


The irregular shape of the eye makes it hard for traditional contact lenses to fit and provide clear vision and therefore requires specialized contact lenses such as toric lenses or rigid gas permeable lenses (RGPs).


Colored Contact Lenses

Colored contact lenses allow you to change your eye color and create a look that's subtle, bold or anywhere in between. Color contacts are available in both prescription and Plano (non-prescription) forms: Prescription color contacts correct your myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) or astigmatism, as well as enhancing or completely changing your eye color. Plano color contacts are worn purely for cosmetic purposes to change your eye color and have no lens power for vision correction.


Dry Eyes and Contact Lenses

Dry Eye Syndrome causes your eyes to feel dry, gritty, burning, red, and irritated. Dry Eye Syndrome can also cause blurred vision. Often these symptoms can sometimes worsen by the use of contacts. In fact, many people who do not normally suffer from chronic dry eyes, will experience some of these symptoms as a result of contact lens wear.


First of all, if you have chronic dry eyes, you should see your eye doctor for treatment and relief before you think about contact lenses. Once your dry eyes are treated, it is safe to try contacts and there are a number of options that can be considered.


Many brands of soft contacts and products such as disinfectant and cleansing solutions are made with ingredients that are designed to be more comfortable for individuals with dry eyes. Your eye doctor will be able to recommend some of these brands and products to you. Alternatively, gas permeable (GP) or rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses are made with a hard material that in some cases does not dry out like soft lenses and they are able to hold a certain amount of moisture beneath the lens to keep the eye from drying out. Gas permeable lenses are a very good option and can be quite comfortable for individuals with dry eyes.


Additionally, your doctor might recommend a specific wearing schedule such as limiting the time you wear your contacts throughout the day or replacing your contacts on a more frequent basis.

Please contact us at (509) 529-2020 if you are having any issues or guestions for our staff.